HOW DOES SCOTT QUIGG BEAT CARL FRAMPTON?

Luke Madeira

I’ve been watching a few interviews that Carl Frampton has conducted over the last few days, and it got me thinking. How does Scott Quigg actually win this fight?

One of the key points that Carl and his team have put across is that Quigg cannot adapt as a fight goes on and has no intelligence within the ring, but I dispute that.

Look at Scott’s fight against Hidenori Otake as an example of this. The tough Japanese fighter withstood early pressure from Quigg and forced the fight into the later rounds. Quigg quickly realised how tough his opponent was and outboxed him instead through the later rounds. If that isn’t adaptability then I don’t know what is?

Scott Quigg and Joe GallagherThis adaptability and intelligence that Quigg has proven on many occasions may allow him to cut off the ring during the fight, meaning that he can land his hurtful punches. It is key for Quigg to land some meaningful shots early on, especially to the body, to keep the Irish man alert and almost tentative.

Another factor that may prove to be decisive, and one that is rarely mentioned, is the height difference between the two. Scott Quigg is a very big super-bantamweight standing at 5 foot 7, where as Frampton is only 5 foot 5. If Quigg can use this to his advantage and get on the inside, there is no doubting who the stronger man is. This may only be a slight difference, but it could well prove to be the difference in such a close fight.

Scott QuiggOne distinct difference that may prove to be pivotal in the fight will be outside the ring in each respective corner. Joe Gallagher is undoubtedly one of the best trainers on the planet right now, and a good game plan could prove to be the difference in the fight. Gallagher seems to put the perfect game plan into place just when it matters. From setting Kiko Martinez up for the uppercut, to targeting Stephan Jamoye with the body shots, Gallagher can seem to do nothing wrong in the Bury man’s corner. Does Shane McGuigan have the experience needed in the corner in world level fights to be able to guide his man to victory?

This may prove to be an unpopular opinion, but could the previous opponents of both fighters and the experiences gained from those fights come into play? Lets take Kiko Martinez out of the equation for a moment as both fighters have fought him, and compare the other opponents. Which one of these is a better set of previous opponents; Alejandro Gonzalez Jr, Chris Avalos and Jeremy Parodi or Hidenori Otake, Tshifhiwa Munyai and Yoandris Salinas?

There is only one answer to that question in my eyes, but I will let you decide for yourself.

Knock out power. I have not seen anybody disagree with the fact that the Bury man carries the knock out power to finish the fight in one punch with either hand. Quigg is very heavy handed and in this sport, it only takes one punch.

The general consensus seems to be this; Quigg by stoppage or Frampton on points…

Frampton - QuiggMy personal opinion is that Quigg will win the fight by stoppage between rounds 6-8 by executing the perfect game plan. I think he will look to frustrate Frampton early on, so that he leaves himself open as the fight goes on. This will allow Quigg to work on the body, lower Frampton’s guard and then land the devastating power shots that will be needed to finish the fight. The left hook to the body will be vital for the Bury man, and could be the key to him winning the fight. Quigg’s boxing brain has been very much underrated in the build up to this fight, and I think that will take its toll as the fight wears on. With Quigg’s intelligence, adaptability, skill and power, he will have too much for Frampton.

One thing is for certain, the winner does not have an easy assignment next. They have to deal with the small matter of one of the best fighters on the planet – Guillermo Rigondeaux.

Whatever the outcome, it is sure to be a showcase of British Boxing, with the fight being shown live all around the world. Both fighters have the chance to stake a real claim as one of the worlds best, we will just have to wait and see who takes the opportunity.

Follow Luke on twitter @lukemadeira15

About Luke Madeira 57 Articles
Luke Madeira currently writes for InstantBoxing.com and is the creator and author of the series 'Under the Radar' which focuses on up and coming British prospects that may not be getting the media attention their talent so richly deserves. Contact Luke on Twitter: @lukemadeira15